Biological Sciences

BSc in BIOCHEMISTRY
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

BIO 103 Biochemistry I:

The first semester of a comprehensive introductory course that describes basic biochemistry and reviews current concepts of modern cell and molecular biology. The biochemistry component of the course (first half) will cover the structure and function of proteins and enzymes, and carbohydrates and lipids, metabolism.
Mandatory prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 201 & BIO 202
Recommended Books:
Berg, JM, Tymoczko, JL, & Stryer L. 2007. Biochemistry. W.H. Freeman Publications
Alberts, B. 2008. Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th Edition). Garland Science Publication
Nelson, DL & Cox, MM. 2008. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry (5th Edition). W.H. Freeman Publications
Donald Voet, Charlotte W. Pratt, and Judith G. Voet, Principals of Biochemistry (4th edition)
Thomas M. Devlin ,Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations (7th edition)

BIO 104 Biochemistry II:

The second semester of a comprehensive introductory course that describes nucleic acid chemistry and function, DNA as hereditary material, and the central dogma in genetics as well as eukaryotic replication,transcription, RNA processing, control of gene expression by methylation, translation, cell cycle,oncogenes and tumor suppressors, viral vectors, and gene therapy.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 201, BIO 202 & BIO 103
Recommended Books:
Berg, JM, Tymoczko, JL, & Stryer L. 2007. Biochemistry. W.H. Freeman Publications
Alberts, B. 2008. Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th Edition). Garland Science Publications
D. Peter Snustad and Michael J. Simmons ,Principles of Genetics (6th Edition)

BIO 106 Introductory Chemistry I Lecture & Lab:

A development of the fundamental principles of chemistry and their applications. Chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding theories, thermochemistry, periodic properties, solution calculations, gas laws and the properties of solids and liquids are among the topics discussed. At the end of this course students will have idea about thermodynamics, where they will learn the first law of thermodynamics and all of the terminology associated with it, thermochemistry (including exothermic and endothermic reactions).
Prerequisites: BIO 102
Recommended Books:
Pauling, L. 1988. General Chemistry (3rd Edition), Dover Publications
Ebbing, DD & Gammon, SD 2007. General Chemistry (9th Edition). Cengage Learning Publishers

BIO 107 Introductory Chemistry II Lecture & Lab:

A continuation of the study of the principles of chemistry and their applications. The topics include solution properties, acids and bases, ionic equations, oxidation-reduction, equilibrium, kinetics, descriptive chemistry of the elements, nuclear chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry. At the end of course students will have idea about the second law of thermodynamics. The second part of emphasis will be chemical equilibrium, where they will learn the basic nature of, chemical kinetics, acids and bases, properties of liquids and lastly spectrophotometry.
Prerequisites: BIO 102 & BIO 106
Recommended Books:
Pauling, L. 1988. General Chemistry (3rd Edition), Dover Publications
Ebbing, DD & Gammon, SD 2007. General Chemistry (9th Edition). Cengage Learning Publishers

PHYS 101 University Physics I + Lab:

This is the first part of a two part class. List of Topics: Mechanics: vectors; motion in one- and two-dimension; Newton's laws of motion; work, energy and momentum; rotation: elasticity. Heat and Thermodynamics: temperature and heat; first and second laws of thermodynamics. Waves and Acoustics: periodic motion and simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves and vibrating bodies; acoustic phenomena. Optics: nature and propagation of light; reflection and refraction; lenses and optical instruments; interference and diffraction. The course will cover the basic concepts of motion, energy, thermodynamics and light & optics.
Recommended Books:
Young, HD, Freedman RA, & Sears FW. 2007. University Physics with Modern Physics (12th Edition). Pearson-Addison-Wesley Publications
Wolfson, R. 2006. Essential University Physics. Pearson-Addison-Wesley Publications

BIO 201 Organic Chemistry I:

A first semester course will discusses the chemistry of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons and their derivatives, their syntheses, nomenclature, reactions, mechanisms, stereochemistry and uses. A number of topics will be covered that include the physico-chemical parameters of biomolecules, nature of bonding in organic molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction mechanisms (including their structure and reactivity), aliphatic nuclephillic substitution, aromatic nucleophillic substitution.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 106
Recommended Books:
Wade, LG. 2009. Organic Chemistry. Prentice Hall Publications
McMurry, J. 2008. Organic Chemistry. Thomson Brooks/Cole Publishers

BIO 202 Organic Chemistry II:

A continuation of Organic Chemistry I; discusses spectroscopic, chemical and physical properties and uses of organic compounds; emphasizes aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, acids, amines and derivatives; touches on carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins. A number of topics will be covered that include organic synthetic techniques involved in drug research, stereochemistry and stereoisomerism, properties of alcohols, ethers, epoxides, and diols, dienes, aromaticity, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, nitro-compounds and amines, phenols and heterocyclic compounds.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 106, & BIO 201
Recommended Books:
Wade, LG. 2009. Organic Chemistry. Prentice Hall Publications
McMurry, J. 2008. Organic Chemistry. Thomson Brooks/Cole Publishers

BIO 203 Cell Biology I:

Structural and functional relationships of cells are discussed with regard to similarities among all living organisms. This course is the first part of an introduction to cellular biochemistry, metabolism and energy flow, cellular and Mendelian genetics, and the chemical basis of heredity. Topics covered include: basic properties of cells; prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; viruses; biological molecules: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. There are three areas that will be emphasized in this course. The first will be the general concept of life and identifying living processes The second will be a brief introduction to the cell, including its historical background (ex. Advent of Microscopy, Cell theory). It will also include overview of the modern techniques of study (ex. Cell fractionation; Development of the Electron Microscopy). The cell size, structure and life processes such as mitosis and meiosis will be covered as well. Third the Cell membrane system will be explored. Here the cell membrane's organization will be discussed in addition to basic components of a cell including the nucleus, mitochondria, Golgi bodies, endoplasmic reticulum, cell walls, lysosomes and microbodies.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107 & BIO 201
Recommended Books:
Karp, G. 2007. Cell and Molecular Biology: Concepts and Experiments (4th Edition), Wiley Publishers
Harden, J. 2011. Becker's World of the Cell (8th Edition). Benjamin Cummings Publishers
Alberts, B 2008 Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th Edition)

BIO 204 Cell Biology II:

This course will discuss techniques used in cell and molecular biology; enzymes; metabolism; mitochondrion structure and function; chloroplast structure and function; plasma membrane composition, structure, and function; the movement of substances across cell membranes; the endomembrane system; the extracellular matrix; the structure and function of the nucleus; genes and chromosomes; cytoskeleton and cell motility; cellular reproduction; cell signaling; cancer. Important topics covered in this course include the cell cycle, apoptosis, stem cells, etc.
Prerequisites: : BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 201, BIO 202, BIO 203
Recommended Books:
Karp, G. 2007. Cell and Molecular Biology: Concepts and Experiments (4th Edition), Wiley Publishers
Harden, J. 2011. Becker's World of the Cell (8th Edition). Benjamin Cummings Publishers
Alberts, B 2008 Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th Edition)

BIO 205 Biochemistry Laboratory:

Introduction to modern experimental methodology and instrumentation in biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology, including cell culture; spectrophotometry; microscopy; nucleic acid purification and analysis; protein assays; enzyme purification; electrophysiology
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO202, BIO103
Recommended Books:
Nigam, A & Ayyagari, A. 2008. Lab Manual in Biochemistry, Immunology, and Biotechnology. McGraw Hill Education Publications
Boyer, RF. 2011. Biochemistry Laboratory: Modern Theory and Techniques (2nd Edition). Prentice Hall Publications

BIO 206 Organic Chemistry Laboratory:

Experiments and exercises will be conducted to introduce students to the basic laboratory techniques that are used in organic chemistry and that re-enforce and illustrate several important topics in organic chemistry.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, BIO 201 & BIO 202
Recommended Books:
Svoronos, P, Sarlo, E & Kulawiec, R. 1996. Organic Chemistry Laboratory Manual. WCB/McGraw Hill Publications
Hart, H, Hart, DJ, Craine, LE & Vinod, TK. 2006. Organic Chemistry Laboratory Manual: A Short Course. Houghton Mifflin Publishers

BIO 207 Genetics:

on fundamental genetic processes in bacteria, bacteriophages, fungi, and animal viruses. Topics include the nature of mutations and mechanisms of mutagenesis, genetic complementation, recombination, transposition, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, yeast and other fungi as tools for eukaryotic molecular biology, human genetic analysis, through linkage mapping and linkage disequilibrium, and genetic mechanisms in bacterial and mammalian viruses.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 106, BIO 107, , BIO 203
Recommended Books:
Griffiths, AJF, Miller, JH, Suzuki, DT, Lewontin RC & Gelbart, WM. 2000. An Introduction to Genetic Analysis (7th Edition). W.H. Freeman Publishers
Miesfeld R. 1999. Applied Molecular Genetics. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. Publishers
D. Peter Snustad and Michael J. Simmons ,Principles of Genetics (6th Edition)

BIO 208 Microbiology:

Introduces the nature and diversity of microorganisms and their implications for all of biology. The course covers comparative properties of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbes, as well as their roles as disease agents, ecological agents and model systems used to understand the fundamental biological processes at the molecular level.
Prerequisites: BIO 102
Recommended Books:
Willey, J, Sherwood, L & Woolverton, C. 2010. Prescott's Microbiology. McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Publishers
Pommerville, JC. 2010. Alcamo's Fundamentals of Microbiology (9th Edition). Jones and Bartlett Publications

BIO 209 Immunology:

Biology of the immune system; The course will cover cellular and molecular mechanisms, host resistance to infectious agents, hypersensitivities, autoimmunity, as well as tumor and tissue rejection.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 103, BIO 204, BIO 208
Recommended Books:
Goldsby, RA, Kindt, TJ, Osborne, BA & Kuby J. 2003. Immunology (5th Edition). W.H. Freeman Publishers
Roitt, I, Male D, Brostoff, J. 1996. Immunology (4th Edition). Mosby-Year Book Publications

BIO 210 Departmental Seminar in Health, Biotechnology, & Development:

In this seminar course, students will be exposed to presentations by leaders in their particular fields of study. Invited speakers will include individuals from academia, industry, government, and international health programs. Talks will span a wide variety of disciplines from accomplished professionals who will share their "real world" experiences. Students will be expected to participate in post-lecture discussions and engage one-on-one with the presenter.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 202, BIO 203

BIO 211 Enzymology:

Designed to give students an understanding of the physical, chemical and kinetic properties of enzymes. Purification, characterization, and quantitative evaluation of the influence of parameters such as concentrations of substrate and enzyme, pH, temperature, and inhibitors on activity are stressed. Specificity and mechanism of action of enzymes are described by considering examples selected from among enzymes of importance to food science, nutrition, and the biological sciences.
In details this course will build an understanding on the properties, catalysis, specificity and regulation and classification of enzymes along with the concept of cofactors, coenzymes and vitamins. The primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of enzymes along with its folding domains and idea on molecular chaperons will be discussed. The student will be aware of the catalysis and enzyme mechanism which involves understanding on active site, substrate binding, general acid-base catalysis, non-protein catalysis and metal ions. The kinetics of enzyme catalysed reactions will be studied with an understanding on key terms like catalytic activity, enzyme kinetics, Michaelis-Menten kinetics, turnover number, Km, Vmax; and influences of pH, temperature, chemical agents on enzyme activity. Different types of enzyme inhibition- competitive, non-competitive and un-competitive; deactivation models and strategies for enzyme stabilization.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204
Recommended Books:
Price, NC & Stevens, L. 1999. Fundamentals of Enzymology: The Cell and Molecular Biology of Catalytic Proteins (3rd Edition). Oxford University Press, USA
Nord, FF. 2007. Advances in Enzymology and Related Areas of Molecular Biology. John Wiley & Sons
Donald Voet, Charlotte W. Pratt, and Judith G. Voet, Principals of Biochemistry (4th edition) Thomas M. Devlin ,Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations (7th edition)

BIO 301 Experimental Design, Research Methods and Biostatistics:

Biostatistical concepts necessary for the interpretation, evaluation, and communication of biomedical research are introduced. Course topics include biomedical study design, randomization, graphical data displays, control of bias, variability, confounding, interaction, and ethics of human experimentation.
Prerequisites: PHY 101, MAT 211, BIO 211, BIO 303
Recommended Books:
Zolman, JF. 1993. Biostatistics: Experimental Design and Statistical Inference (1st Edition). Oxford University Press, USA
Zar, JH. 1998. Biostatistical Analysis (4th Edition). Prentice Hall Publishers

BIO 302 Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics:

This course will introduce the student to the scope and content of the field of bioinformatics, including core concepts in biological and information sciences, and their fusion for biology information processing. Common problems, data and tools in the field will be outlined. Upon completion of this course, a student will understand the relation of bioinformatics for information engineering with biosciences, particularly molecular biology and genetics, and areas of biotechnology, genomics and proteomics.
Prerequisites: BIO 207, BIO 211, BIO 303, BIO 301
Recommended Books:
Campbell, AM & Heyer, LJ. 2002. Discovering Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics. Benjamin Cummings Publishers
Pevsner, J. 2009. Bioinformatics and Functional Genomes (2nd Edition). Wiley-Blackwell Publishers Lesk, AM. 2002. Introduction to Bioinformatics. Oxford University Press, USA

BIO 303 Molecular Biology:

In details the course will teach the student the preparation of total cell DNA, preparation of plasmid DNA, preparation of bacteriophage DNA. The techniques of molecular genetics like production of recombinant DNA in vitro; amplification of recombinant DNA in cloning vector; construction and screening of DNA libraries; molecular analysis of DNA, RNA and protein by blotting techniques; amplification of DNA by PCR etc will be included. The course will discuss about the different restriction endonucleases and other nucleases, ligases, polymerases, DNA modifying enzymes, topoisomerases along with different cloning vectors- plasmids (pBR322, pUC 119), cosmids, bacteriophage M 13, yeast episomal plasmid etc. The students will also learn about ligation systems (blunt end ligation, sticky end ligation, sticky ends to blunt ends, homopolymer tailing etc); transformation of bacterial cells and selection of recombinants; introduction of phage DNA into bacterial cell and selection of recombinant phage; transformation of non-bacterial cells; DNA sequencing; RFPL analysis; requirement for gene expression; expression vectors; regulation of gene expression and others.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 205, BIO 206, BIO 209, BIO 211
Recommended Books:
Alberts, B. 2008. Molecular Biology of the Cell (5th Edition). Garland Science Publications
Nicholl, DST. 2002. An Introduction to Genetic Engineering (2nd Edition). Cambridge University Press
Nair, AJ. 2008. An Introduction to Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering. Jones & Bartlett Publishers

BIO 304 Molecular Biology Laboratory:

Introduction to the various tools of molecular biology including all the basic methods of molecular biology: cloning, PCR, Southern (DNA) blotting, Northern (RNA) blotting, Western blotting, DNA sequencing, oligo-directed mutagenesis, and protein expression.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 209, BIO 211, BIO 205, BIO 206
Recommended Books:
Sambrook, J & Russell, D. 2001. Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual (3rd Edition). CSH Press
Surzycki, S. 2003. Human Molecular Biology Laboratory Manual. Wiley-Blackwell Publications

BIO 305 Molecular Biology of Diseases:

Human diseases fall into three broad categories according to our understanding of their origins: genetic, infectious, and indeterminate. This course will give students an opportunity to learn some of the many molecular mechanisms of diseases caused by novel alleles. It will also include molecular basis of genetic disorders, inborn errors of metabolism and implications for novel therapeutics.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 209, BIO 211
Recommended Books:
Ahmed, N, Dawson, M, Smith, C & Wood, E. 2007. Biology of Disease. Routledge, UK Publishers
Pasternak, JJ. 2005. An Introduction to Human Molecular Genetics (2nd Edition). Wiley-Liss Publishers

BIO 306 Concepts in Biotechnology:

This course addresses the basic principles, concepts and techniques of biotechnology necessary for an understanding of the field, and effective work in a pharmaceutical, biotechnological and/or research laboratory setting(s). Practical applications of biotechnology are explored. The course covers techniques currently used to explore and manipulate gene function, and their potential and actual commercial applications. Part I covers key laboratory manipulations, including DNA cloning, gene characterization, association of genes with disease, and methods for studying gene regulation and activities of gene products. Part II covers commercial application, including animal cell culture, production of recombinant proteins, novel diagnostics, high throughput screening, and environmental biosensors.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 209, BIO 211
Recommended Books:
Barnum, SR. 2004. Biotechnology: An Introduction (2nd Edition). Brooks Cole Publishers
Ratledge, C & Kristiansen, B. 2001. Basic Biotechnology (2nd Edition). Cambridge University Press

BIO 307 Genetic Engineering:

Introduces genetic engineering, with an emphasis on applications (transgenic plants and animals, cloning, vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics).
Prerequisites: BIO 207, BIO 303, BIO 306
Recommended Books:
Nicholl, DST. 2002. An Introduction to Genetic Engineering (2nd Edition). Cambridge University Press
Nair, AJ. 2008. An Introduction to Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering. Jones & Bartlett Publishers

BIO 401 Readings in Biochemistry:

Intensive reading course that provides basic instruction in the critical evaluation of scientific literature. Emphasis will be on current publications in the biological sciences. This is an advanced course that uses detailed discussion of the primary literature to understand fundamental cellular processes. The focus is on dissecting research papers to gain insight into the rationale behind specific experimental approaches, understand how experiments are performed and critically analyze the data and interpretations. We will start with an introduction to critical thinking and experimental design and then probe four sequential papers from a prominent research lab that all investigate the same biological process. In this way, students gain an understanding of the creative nature of laboratory research and see how a research project develops and diversifies.
Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 210

BIO 402 Student Symposium in Biochemistry:

: In this seminar course, students will present and critically analyze select, recent publications in biochemistry and molecular/cell biology. Each student will be responsible for at least one formal presentation of published work.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO210, BIO 301, BIO302, BIO 303, BIO 304, BIO305

BIO 403A Culture of Animal Cells: Techniques in Tissue Culture (Lab):

Theoretical and practical introduction to the methods of animal cell culture necessary for research in biomedical or biotech labs and in the pharmaceutical industry. Techniques will include choice of medium, passaging, freezing, tests of purity and viability, stable and transient transfection, and preparing primary cultures.
Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206, BIO 304, BIO 301, BIO 302
Recommended Books:
Freshney, RI. 2000. Culture of Animal Cells: A Manual of Basic Technique (4th Edition). Wiley-Liss Publishers
Davis, JM. 2002. Basic Cell Culture (2nd Edition). Oxford University Press, USA

BIO 403B Culture of Plant Cells: Techniques in Tissue Culture (Lab):

This course provides an overview of the principles, techniques, and applications of plant tissue culture. Lectures and hands-on laboratories will cover topics including aseptic techniques, culture methodology, laboratory equipment, micropropagation, callus, embryogenesis etc. As a result of this course, students will be able to identify and apply knowledge of techniques in plant tissue culture to their research and future careers.
Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206, BIO 304, BIO 301, BIO 302
Recommended Books:
Smith, RH. 2000. Plant Tissue Culture (2nd Edition). Academic Press
Dodds, JH, Roberts, LW & Heslop-Harrison, J. 1995. Experiments in Plant Tissue Culture (3rd Edition). Cambridge University Press

BIO 404 Virology:

Prokaryotic and eukaryotic viruses as infectious agents and models for modern molecular biology. The course examines concepts and principles of pathogenesis, host response and the regulation of virus-host interactions. Genome organization, structure and replication will be examined within the context of the co-evolution of virus and host.
Prerequisites: BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 207, BIO 208
Recommended Books:
Belshe, RB. 1990. Textbook of Human Virology (2nd Edition). Mosby-Year Book Publishers
Enquist, RW, Krug, RM, Racaniello, VR, Skalka, AM, Flint, SJ & Flint, S Jane. 1999. Principles of Virology: Molecular Biology, Pathogenesis, and Control (1st Edition). American Society Microbiology

BIO 405 Principles of Recombinant DNA Technology:

This course covers basic methods in biotechnology for the manipulation of nucleic acids. Emphasis is placed on topics concerning techniques used in recombinant DNA technology, including PCR, DNA sequencing, restriction digests, mapping, cloning, and DNA typing as applied in restriction digests, mapping, cloning, and forensics. Upon completion, students should have an understanding of the theory, practice, and application of recombinant DNA techniques.
Prerequisites: BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 207, BIO 303 , BIO 307
Recommended Books:
Watson, JD, Myers, RM, Caudy, AA & Witkowski, JA. 2006. Recombinant DNA: Genes and Genomes—A Short Course (3rd Edition). W.H. Freeman Publishers
Micklos, DA, Freyer, GA & Crotty, DA. 2003. DNA Science: A First Course (2nd Edition). CSHL Press

BIO 406 Evolutionary Biology:

Advanced lectures on evolution that consider traits, genes, and their interaction with environmental variation. Topics include the basic quantitative methods required to interpret evolutionary change, the consequences of population structure, molecular approaches to phylogenetic studies, and the changes in genetic variation under different models of selection, drift, migration, and mutation.
Prerequisites: BIO 207, BIO 203, BIO 204
Recommended Books:
Futuyma, DJ. 1997. Evolutionary Biology (3rd Edition). Sinauer Associates Publishers
Elliott Sober Editor. 2006. Conceptual Issues in Evolutionary Biology (3rd Edition). The MIT Press

BIO 407 Techniques in Biochemistry:

The goal of this course is to familiarize the students with a variety of powerful and sophisticated modern instrumentation to analyze the properties and interactions of biological macromolecules in vitro and in vivo. The course will cover the principles behind various experimental techniques, including titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and DNA microarray technology.
Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 211, BIO 209
Recommended Books:
Wilson, K & Walker, J Editors. 2005. Principles and Techniques of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (6th Edition). Cambridge University Press
Pingoud, A, Urbanke, C, Hoggett, J & Jeltsch, A. 2002 Biochemical Methods: A Concise Guide for Students and Researchers. Wiley-VCH Publishers

BIO 408 Plant Biotechnology:

Using examples from current research, techniques used in modern plant biotechnology and the way this technology is being used to modify and improve economically important plants and their use as biofactories will be discussed. Specific topics will include gene isolation, plant transformation, plant tissue culture, clonal plant propagation, and somatic embryogenesis.
Prerequisites: BIO 303, BIO 306, BIO 304
Recommended Books:
Chawla, HS. 2009. Introduction to Plant Biology (3rd Edition). Science Publishers
Stewart Jr., CN. 2008. Plant Biotechnology and Genetics: Principles, Techniques, and Applications. Wiley-Interscience Publishers

BIO 409 Microbial Biotechnology:

This course looks into the development of microbial use in traditional fermentation processes, strain selection as well as the development of recombinant microbes for industrial, commercial, environmental, pharmaceutical and medical applications
Prerequisites: BIO 208, BIO 211, BIO 303, BIO 306
Recommended Books:
Glazer, AN & Nikaido, H. 1995. Microbial Biotechnology: Fundamentals of Applied Microbiology (2nd Edition). W.H. Freeman & Associates
Kun, LY. 2006. Microbial Biotechnology: Principles and Applications (2nd Edition). World Scientific Publishing Company

BIO 410 Industrial Biotechnology:

This course introduces students to the field of bioscience manufacturing. Topics will include basic principles of the industry, large-scale process development and the future of the bioscience industry. Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs), and the nature and delivery system of products will also be discussed.
Prerequisites: BIO 208, BIO 211, BIO 303, BIO 306
Recommended Books:
Crueger, W & Crueger, A. 1995. Industrial Biotechnology: Fundamentals of Applied Microbiology (2nd Edition). W.H. Freeman & Associates
Waites, MJ, Morgan, NL, Rockey, JS & Higton, G. 2001. Industrial Biotechnology: an Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell Publishers

BIO 411 Drugs and the Body:

This course will introduce students to the basic principles of drug action. The first set of lectures will cover factors affecting drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and will focus on the mechanism of action of drugs at the cellular, molecular, and biochemical level. The second set of lectures will describe therapeutic drug use and side-effects of selected drug categories: antimicrobials, anti cancer drugs, general and local anesthetics, central nervous system drugs, hormones, and drugs regulating lipid and glucose metabolism.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 211, BIO 305
Recommended Books:
Liska, K. 2008. Drugs and the Human Body (8th Edition). Prentice Hall Publishers
Katzung, B, Masters, M & Trevor, A. 2009. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. (11th Edition). McGraw-Hill Medical

BIO 412 The Ethics of Biological Research and Technology:

Surveys contemporary issues relating to scientific integrity and responsible conduct in research. Topics include ethical scientific conduct, scientific fraud and misconduct, authorship and peer review, use of humans and animals in biomedical research, ownership of data, intellectual property, conflict of interest, scientific record keeping, academic honor codes, and the ethics of genetic technology. The course consists of interactive lectures followed by small group discussion of cases.
Prerequisites: BIO 301, BIO 401
Recommended Books:
Bulger, RE, Heitman, E, & Reiser, SJ. 2002. The Ethical Dimensions of the Biological and Health Sciences (2nd Edition). Cambridge University Press
Shamoo, AE & Resnik, DB. 2009. Responsible Conduct of Research (2nd Edition). Oxford University Press, USA.

BIO 413 Nutrition, Metabolism and Disease:

Role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, water, vitamins and minerals in human nutrition. The course examines the relationship of nutrition to the maintenance of health and prevention of disease. The role of nutrition in weight control, sports nutrition, eating disorders, pregnancy/lactation, and chronic disease and gene expression are discussed.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 211
Recommended Books:
Shils, ME, Shike, M, Ross, AC, Caballero, B & Cousins, RJ Editors . 2005. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease (10th Edition). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Publishers
Gropper, SS & Smith, JL. 2008. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism (5th Edition). Wadsworth Publishing

BIO 414 Endocrinology:

Physiology and biochemistry of the endocrine system and its hormones with special reference to vertebrates and to human endocrine disorders. Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204
Recommended Books:
Larsen, PR, Kronenberg, HM, Melmed, S, Polonsky, KS, Wilson, JD, Foster, DW & Kronenberg, HM. 2002. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology (10th Edition). Saunders Publishing
Greenspan, FS & Gardner, DJ. 2003. Basic and Clinical Endocrinology (7th Edition). McGraw-Hill Medical

BIO 415 Clinical Biochemistry:

Discusses biochemical principles underlying human health and disease. The course relates molecular mechanisms and the associated chemical and enzymatic alterations to normal and abnormal clinical conditions.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 203, BIO 204
Recommended Books:
Gaw, A, Murphy, MJ, Cowan, RA, St. J. Oreilly, D, Stewart, MJ & Shepherd, J. 2008. Clinical Biochemistry: An Illustrated Color Text (4th Edition). Churchill Livingstone Publishers
Lieberman, MA & Marks, A. 2008. Mark's Basic Medical Biochemistry: A Clinical Approach (3rd Edition). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

BIO 416 Human Physiology:

Advanced undergraduate study of human organ physiology, with emphasis on homeostasis, along with nervous and hormonal regulation of various organ systems. Considerations of cellular and molecular interactions are emphasized.
Prerequisites: BIO 103, BIO 104, BIO 209, BIO 211
Recommended Books:
Ober, WC, Garrison, CW, Silverthorn, AC & Silverthorn, DU (editor). 2000. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach (2nd Edition). Benjamin-Cummings Publishing Co.
Sherwood, L. 2003. Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems (5th Edition). Brooks Cole Publishers

BIO 417 Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology:

Introduction to the molecular biology of neurons and neuronal functions. Topics of study will include: the molecular composition of nerve cells, and how this provides a basis for their functional properties; their synaptic connectivity; how they receive, transmit, and retain information at a molecular level. Studies will focus on current research in the field of molecular neurobiology.
Prerequisites: BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 303
Recommended Books:
Hammond, C. 2001. Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology (2nd Edition). Academic Press
Byrne, JH & Roberts, JL. 2003. From Molecules to Networks: An Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (1st Edition). Academic Press

BIO 418 Molecular Biology of Cancer:

The basic concepts of molecular biology are examined and used to probe the process by which a normal cell becomes a cancer cell. The course investigates DNA damage and repair, chemical carcinogenesis, gene cloning and manipulation, the control of gene expression in eukaryotes, tumor viruses, the roles of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in carcinogenesis, and cancer therapy.
Prerequisites: BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 303, BIO 305
Recommended Books:
Weinberg, RA. 2006. The Biology of Cancer. Garland Science Publishers
Pecorino,L. 2008. The Molecular Biology of Cancer: Mechanisms, Targets, and Therapeutics (2nd Edition). Oxford University Press, USA

BIO 419 Developmental Biology:

The study of the processes and events involved in differentiation and development from gametogenesis through the embryonic and fetal periods. Cellular and molecular aspects of sex determination, gametogenesis, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, telomerase as the biological clock, stem cells, cloning, the pill and cell interactions will be explored. The human is used as the primary model organism. Developmental disorders are also examined.
Prerequisites: BIO 207, BIO 303
Recommended Books:
Gilbert, SF. 2010. Developmental Biology (9th Edition). Sinauer Associates
Wolpert, L & Tickle, C. 2010. Principles of Development (4th Edition). Oxford University Press, USA

BIO 420 Signal Transduction:

Understanding mechanisms of cellular communication: current concepts of signal transduction. The course will review hormone and neurotransmitter receptors as well as the cellular effectors that are regulated by receptor activation. Oncogene products as signal transducers and the interaction of known signaling pathways are also covered. The various techniques used to study signal transduction as well as important experimental strategies employing these techniques will also be presented.
Prerequisites: BIO 203, BIO 204, BIO 209
Recommended Books:
Gomperts, BD. 2003. Signal Transduction. Academic Press
Hancock, J. 2010. Cell Signalling (3rd Edition). Oxford University Press, USA

BIO 421 Epigenetics:

The focus is on understanding the mechanisms underlying epigenetic phenomena. Epigenetic mechanisms play important roles during normal animal development and oncogenesis. It is an area under intensive scientific investigation and the course will focus on recent advances in understanding these phenomena. In each class, students will present and discuss in detail recent papers and background material concerning each individual topic, followed by an introductory lecture on the following week's topic. This course will emphasize critical analysis of the scientific literature and help students understand how to identify important biological problems and how to address them experimentally.
Prerequisites: BIO 207, BIO 303
Recommended Books:
Allis, CD, Jenuwein, T, Reinberg, D & Caparros, M. 2007. Epigenetics. Cold Spring Harbor Press
Turner, BM. 2002. Chromatin and Gene Regulation: Molecular Mechanisms in Epigenetics. Wiley-Blackwell Publishers

BIO 450 Senior Project:

This course will entail that the student either work on a lab-based project or write a scientific literature review under the supervision of a faculty member. Part 1 of this two-part course comprises the research component of the work performed either doing original lab work or reviewing the existing literature for a particular topic.
Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206, BIO 401 and at least one elective course.

BIO 452 Internship in Biochemistry:

The internship will provide students with hands-on work experience in Biochemistry or related disciplines either within the University or in outside institutions. The experience readies the individual for their first position in the field along with continued attention to and application of skills required to gain employment.
Prerequisites: Minimum two elective courses

Contact Us

School of Life Sciences
Independent University, Bangladesh
Academic Block (8th Floor)
Room: 10002
Plot 16 Block B
Aftabuddin Ahmed Road
Bashundhara R/A
Dhaka- 1229

Rita Yusuf, Ph.D
Dean
School of Life Sciences
Room: 10002
ritayusuf@iub.edu.bd
Tel: 8431645-52, 8432065-76 (ext-2600)

Nazratun Choudhury
R&D Officer
School of Life Sciences
Room: 10002
nazratunofficial@gmail.com
Tel: 8431645-52, 8432065-76 (ext-2611)